HOME > ISSUES OF CONCERN > NATIVE RIGHTS >

“Indian Grave”, documenting how Afton resident D. J. Peabody cared for the Rattlesnake effigy (Stillwater Gazette, 1956)

D. J. Peabody of Afton steadfastly refuses to budge a 10-foot-high Indian mound in his backyard.

“I could use all that dirt for fill in the rest of my backyard, but I wouldn’t want anyone digging up my grave.” the 60-year-old retired mechanic says. He now runs a hobby shop next to his home.

Both Peabody. who has lived in Afton since 1924, and his father-in-law, Frank Squires, another longtime resident, firmly believe the mound was the head of a 150-foot-long fish shaped Indian burial ground. Time, erosion, floods and cloudbursts have wiped out its contours excepting the head.

“At least one tomahawk and a number of arrowheads have been found in the mound.” Peabody says. “A number of years ago, several workmen uncovered two skulls from the body of the fish.

Peabody is grading the mound lightly so that he can plant grass and keep it mowed.

“Sometimes I like to just stare at the mound and wonder how many Indians are buried there, how they died and what kind of people they were.”


The 1956 article.

The 1956 article.